Enterprise Organizations Are Taking Steps to Improve Cybersecurity Analytics

Last week, online retail giant eBay announced that it was hacked between February and March of this year with stolen login credentials of an eBay employee. This gave the hackers access to the user records of 145 million users including home addresses, e-mail addresses, dates of birth, and encrypted passwords. It appears that the hackers made copies of this data so eBay is advising all users to change their passwords.

Topics: IBM Big Data Cisco Information and Risk Management FireEye Dell endpoint Security and Privacy Security SIEM Narus Mandiant Cybereason LogRhythm 21CT Leidos ISC8 Blue Coat RSA Security Lancope netSkope SDN click security Bit9 cybercrime Carbon Black

Antivirus Software Is Not Quite Dead Yet

In a Wall Street Journal article published earlier this week, Symantec SVP Brian Dye, is quoted as saying that “antivirus is dead.” Dye goes on to proclaim that “we (Symantec) don’t think of antivirus as a moneymaker in any way.”

I beg your pardon, Brian? Isn’t Symantec the market leader? Just what are you saying? In lieu of specific answers to these questions, the blogosphere and Twitter have become a grapevine of rumors – about Symantec, AV, etc. Panic and wild predictions abound. Dogs and cats living together in the streets . . .

Topics: End-User Computing Palo Alto Networks Cisco Information and Risk Management Sourcefire FireEye McAfee Security and Privacy Security endpoint security Malwarebytes Kaspersky Triumfant Guidance Software Crowdstrike trend micro Symantec RSA Security Cylance Bit9 Carbon Black Anti-malware

Managing IT Risk Associated with Mobile Computing Security

When BYOD was coming to fruition a few years ago, it had a sudden and deep impact on IT risk. Why? Many CISOs I spoke with at the time said it was purely a matter of scale. All of a sudden, large enterprises had thousands of additional devices on their networks and they struggled to figure out what these devices were doing and how these activities impacted organizational risk.

Topics: IBM End-User Computing Check Point Fortinet Cisco Information and Risk Management mobile Security and Privacy Security BYOD Citrix data security Fiberlink android Dropbox Good Technology Airwatch Blue Coat CISO Bit9 Anti-malware Facebook

Are Enterprise Organizations Ready to Use Free AV Software?

Last year, ESG published a research report titled, Advanced Malware Detection and Protection Trends, based upon a survey of 315 security professionals working at enterprise organizations (i.e., more than 1,000 employees). In one question, ESG asked security professionals whether they agreed or disagreed with the following statement: “Commercial host-based security software (i.e., AV) is more or less the same as free security software.”

It turns out that 36% of security professionals either “strongly agree” or “agree" with this statement, while another 25% are sitting on the fence (i.e., they neither agree nor disagree with the statement).

Topics: Microsoft Endpoint & Application Virtualization Cisco Information and Risk Management Sourcefire McAfee Security and Privacy Security Bradford Networks Malwarebytes Kaspersky Lab Juniper Networks freeware ForeScout Avast trend micro bromium Symantec security intelligence Great Bay Software antivirus Cylance Bit9 Anti-malware APT

Hot Topics at the RSA Conference

It’s the calm before the storm and I’m not talking about the unusual winter weather. Just a few days before the 2014 RSA Security Conference at the Moscone Center in San Francisco.

In spite of this year’s controversy over the relationship between the NSA and RSA Security (the company), I expect a tremendous turnout that will likely shatter the attendance records of last year. Cybersecurity issues are just too big to ignore so there will likely be a fair number of first-time attendees.

Topics: Cloud Computing Check Point Fortinet Cisco Networking Information and Risk Management FireEye mobile Security and Privacy endpoint security SIEM Cybereason Good Technology bromium 21CT CloudPassage Firewall Cylance click security Bit9 Carbon Black IDS/IPS Firewall & UTM Hexis Cyber Solutions Public Cloud Service

How Antivirus Continues to Compete

Despite well over a decade of sales success, antivirus technology has never been beloved in the security marketplace. Security professionals do not have immense faith in antivirus (AV) products to stop modern malware, and average users have never enjoyed the notifications, scans, and updates that go along with protecting a computer from roughly 6,000 new malware variants per day.

Topics: Information and Risk Management Security and Privacy Security malware Mandiant bromium antivirus Cylance Bit9 AV Guidance antivirus software

Endpoint Security Market Transformation In 2014

It is widely agreed that the security software market is over $20 billion worldwide and that endpoint security software (aka antivirus) makes up the lion’s share of this revenue. After all, AV is an endpoint staple product bundled on new PCs, required as part of regulatory compliance, and even available for free from reputable providers such as Avast, AVG, and Microsoft.

Yup, AV software is certainly pervasive but traditional endpoint security vendors will face a number of unprecedented challenges to their comfy hegemony in 2014 for several reasons:

  1. Security professionals are increasingly questioning AV effectiveness. According to ESG research, 62% of security professionals working at enterprise organizations (i.e., more than 1,000 employees) believe that traditional endpoint security software is not effective for detecting zero-day and/or polymorphic malware commonly used as part of targeted attacks today. To quote Lee Atwater, ‘perception is reality’ when it comes to AV.
  2. Many organizations are already moving beyond AV. ESG research also indicates that over half (51%) of large organizations are planning to add new layers of endpoint security software in order to detect/prevent advanced malware threats. This means that enterprise companies aren’t waiting for AV vendors to catch up but rather spending on new endpoint defenses – likely with new vendors.
  3. The industry is turning up the heat. The AV market has been a cozy oligopoly dominated by a handful of vendors. This market is coming unglued as a combination of new threats and user perceptions is opening the door to an assortment of upstarts. The list includes smaller firms like Bit9, Cylance, Malwarebytes, and Triumfant as well as 800-pound gorillas like Cisco (with Sourcefire FireAMP, IBM (with Trusteer), and RSA Security (with ECAT). Oh, and let’s not forget red hot FireEye’s acquisition of Mandiant or Palo Alto’s purchase of Morta. These two firms are intent on leaving AV vendors in the dust as they pursue the title of “next-generation security company” (whatever that means).
Topics: IBM Microsoft Palo Alto Networks Cisco Information and Risk Management Sourcefire FireEye McAfee Security and Privacy Security Malwarebytes Triumfant Mandiant Avast trend micro RSA antivirus Cylance Bit9 Anti-malware APT Trusteer

Enterprise CISO Challenges In 2014

I’m sure lots of CISOs spent this week meeting with their teams, reviewing their 2013 performance, and solidifying plans for 2014. Good idea from my perspective. The CISOs I’ve spoken with recently know exactly what they have to do but aren’t nearly as certain about how to do it.

At a high level, here’s what I’m hearing around CISO goals and the associated challenges ahead this year:

  1. Improve risk management. This translates into threat/vulnerability measurement, threat prevention, and ongoing communication with the business mucky mucks. The problem here is that their networks are constantly changing, scans are done on a scheduled rather than real-time basis, and the threat landscape is dangerous, sophisticated, and mysterious.
Topics: IBM Palo Alto Networks Cisco Information and Risk Management FireEye HP Security and Privacy Security risk management Centrify Malwarebytes LogRhythm bromium 21CT Leidos RSA Invincea Accenture ISC8 Blue Coat CloudPassage click security Bit9 CSC Hexis HyTrust

Enterprise Organizations Identify Incident Detection Weaknesses

In the past, many large organizations spent about 70% of their security budgets on prevention and the remaining 30% on incident detection and response. Prevention is still important but given the insidious threat landscape, enterprises must assume that they will be breached. This means that they need the right processes, skills, and security analytics to detect and respond to security incidents effectively, efficiently, and in a timely manner.

Topics: IBM Cisco Information and Risk Management Security and Privacy Security Booz Allen Hamilton ForeScout Guidance Software Leidos Blue Coat Fidelis LexisNexis Bit9 CSC Anti-malware

Addressing advanced malware in 2014

In the cybersecurity annals of the future, 2013 may be remembered as the year of advanced malware. Yes, I know that malware is nothing new and the term “advanced” is more hype than reality as a lot of attacks have involved little more than social engineering and off-the-shelf exploits. That said, I think it’s safe to say that this is the year that the world really woke up to malware dangers (advanced or not) and is finally willing to address this risk.

So how will enterprise organizations (i.e., more than 1,000 employees) change their security strategies over the next year to mitigate the risks associated with advanced malware threats? According to ESG research:

  • 51% of enterprise organizations say they will add a new layer of endpoint software to protect against zero day and other types of advanced malware. Good opportunity for Kaspersky, McAfee, Sophos, Symantec, and Trend Micro to talk to customers about innovation and new products but the old guard has to move quickly to prevent an incursion by new players like Bit9, Bromium, Invincea, and Malwarebytes. The network crowd (i.e., Cisco, Check Point, FireEye, Fortinet, and Palo Alto Networks, etc.) may also throw a curveball at endpoint security vendors as well. For example, Cisco (Sourcefire) is already selling an endpoint/network anti-malware solution with a combination of FireAMP and FirePOWER.
  • 49% of enterprise organizations say they will collect and analyze more security data, thus my prediction for an active year in the big data security analytics market – good news for LogRhythm and Splunk. Still, there is a lot of work to be done on the supply and demand side for this to really come to fruition.
  • 44% of enterprise organizations say they will automate more security operations tasks. Good idea since current manual security processes and informal relationship between security and IT operations is killing the effectiveness and pace of security remediation. Again, this won’t be easy as there is a cultural barrier to overcome but proactive organizations are already moving in this direction. If you are interested in this area, I suggest you have a look at Hexis Cyber Solutions’ product Hawkeye G. Forward thinking remediation stuff here.
  • 41% of enterprise organizations say they will design and build a more integrated information security architecture. In other words, they will start replacing tactical point tools with an architecture composed of central command-and-control along with distributed security enforcement. Good idea, CISOs should create a 3-5 year plan for this transition. A number of vendors including HP, IBM, McAfee, RSA Security, and Trend Micro are designing products in this direction with the enterprise in mind.
Topics: IBM Check Point Palo Alto Networks Fortinet Cisco IT Infrastructure Information and Risk Management Sourcefire FireEye HP McAfee Security and Privacy Security endpoint security Kaspersky LogRhythm trend micro bromium Symantec Invincea antivirus RSA Security Sophos Bit9 Anti-malware Hexis Splunk