Enterprises Are Not Monitoring Access to Sensitive Data

If you want to make a cybersecurity professional uncomfortable, simply utter these two word: ‘Data exfiltration.’ Why will this term garner an emotional response? Because data exfiltration is a worst-case outcome of a cyber-attack – think Target, the NY Times, Google Aurora, Titan Rain, etc. Simply stated, ‘data exfiltration’ is a quasi-military term used to describe the theft of sensitive data like credit card numbers, health care records, manufacturing processes, or classified military plans.

Most enterprises now recognize the risks associated with data exfiltration and are now reacting with new types of security technologies, granular network segmentation, and tighter access controls. Good start but what about simply monitoring sensitive data access activities? You know, who accesses the data, how often, what they do, etc.?

Topics: Information and Risk Management Dell Security and Privacy Security google Centrify CyberArk Courion Sailpoint data security Quest Box Symantec Target nsa cybercrime identity and access management security analytics Edward Snowden

Has Mobile Computing Had a Positive Impact on Cybersecurity?

I’ve heard the same story from a multitude of CISOs: “As soon as we agreed to support BYOD and mobile devices, all hell broke loose!” How? All of a sudden there were hundreds or thousands of new devices accessing the corporate network. Many of these devices were employee-owned, unmanaged, and full of questionable applications. What’s more, users were now working on multiple devices and moving sensitive data between Windows PCs, iPads, Android phones, and a slew of online file sharing sites like Box, Dropbox, and iCloud. Holy threat and vulnerability, Batman!

Most enterprise organizations are now way past this early period of mobile security chaos. Yes, there are still plenty of challenges associated with mobile computing security, but did preliminary mobile computing anarchy have any positive impact on information security in the long run? In other words, did the initial mobile computing fire drills actually help CISOs recognize risks and address systemic weaknesses?

Topics: IBM MDM Cisco Information and Risk Management Juniper HP mobile Security and Privacy Security endpoint security Bradford Networks Mobile computing Box Dropbox Aruba Vormetric ForeScout Veracode Great Bay Software NAC

IT's Consumerization Compliance Conundrum

Special thanks to Terri McClure for coming up with this one.

Topics: Information and Risk Management Security and Privacy Amazon Box Dropbox

Files Are Killing IT - And Creating A New Market Opportunity

Data growth is what destroys everything in IT operationally. If data stopped growing, you could actually fix all of your issues once and for all. You would be stable. What a concept!

Topics: IBM Storage Netapp EMC IT Infrastructure HP Box Dropbox