In the Age Of Never-ending Technology Conquests, Common Sense Still Trumps All

Left unchecked, engineers will never actually finish a product. They can always find another great feature to jam into it, and it will only take a few more months. Conversely, salespeople can always sell what’s next way easier than they can sell what’s now. This polarity works, normally. When either is out of balance, companies screw up.

I have a 2015 Chevy Tahoe. Lovely (mostly) vehicle. Has a tremendous amount of bells and whistles. Too many to be useful. Case in point; when I approach a toll booth, the car actually says, “Warning: toll booth.” Someone spent time and money engineering software to determine that a toll booth is within 57 feet of me, and decided it was imperative that the vehicle let me know this fact. Because otherwise I may not know by the simple facts that I’m A: at a toll booth, B: at the toll booth with 8 billion others, or C: it’s probably not a good idea to accelerate to 120MPH whilst going through a toll booth. Fortunately, in this new technology advancement age, the toll booths in MA have all been torn down – and there are new overhead invisible toll suckers in the sky on the highways, which read our plates or tags and charge us accordingly. So now, even when I’m not actually driving through a toll booth, my car still reminds me that I’m driving under a virtual toll booth. That is a prime example of overthinking a non-existing problem.

Topics: technology engineering