Antivirus Software Is Not Quite Dead Yet

In a Wall Street Journal article published earlier this week, Symantec SVP Brian Dye, is quoted as saying that “antivirus is dead.” Dye goes on to proclaim that “we (Symantec) don’t think of antivirus as a moneymaker in any way.”

I beg your pardon, Brian? Isn’t Symantec the market leader? Just what are you saying? In lieu of specific answers to these questions, the blogosphere and Twitter have become a grapevine of rumors – about Symantec, AV, etc. Panic and wild predictions abound. Dogs and cats living together in the streets . . .

Topics: End-User Computing Palo Alto Networks Cisco Information and Risk Management Sourcefire FireEye McAfee Security and Privacy Security endpoint security Malwarebytes Kaspersky Triumfant Guidance Software Crowdstrike trend micro Symantec RSA Security Cylance Bit9 Carbon Black Anti-malware

Endpoint Security Market Transformation In 2014

It is widely agreed that the security software market is over $20 billion worldwide and that endpoint security software (aka antivirus) makes up the lion’s share of this revenue. After all, AV is an endpoint staple product bundled on new PCs, required as part of regulatory compliance, and even available for free from reputable providers such as Avast, AVG, and Microsoft.

Yup, AV software is certainly pervasive but traditional endpoint security vendors will face a number of unprecedented challenges to their comfy hegemony in 2014 for several reasons:

  1. Security professionals are increasingly questioning AV effectiveness. According to ESG research, 62% of security professionals working at enterprise organizations (i.e., more than 1,000 employees) believe that traditional endpoint security software is not effective for detecting zero-day and/or polymorphic malware commonly used as part of targeted attacks today. To quote Lee Atwater, ‘perception is reality’ when it comes to AV.
  2. Many organizations are already moving beyond AV. ESG research also indicates that over half (51%) of large organizations are planning to add new layers of endpoint security software in order to detect/prevent advanced malware threats. This means that enterprise companies aren’t waiting for AV vendors to catch up but rather spending on new endpoint defenses – likely with new vendors.
  3. The industry is turning up the heat. The AV market has been a cozy oligopoly dominated by a handful of vendors. This market is coming unglued as a combination of new threats and user perceptions is opening the door to an assortment of upstarts. The list includes smaller firms like Bit9, Cylance, Malwarebytes, and Triumfant as well as 800-pound gorillas like Cisco (with Sourcefire FireAMP, IBM (with Trusteer), and RSA Security (with ECAT). Oh, and let’s not forget red hot FireEye’s acquisition of Mandiant or Palo Alto’s purchase of Morta. These two firms are intent on leaving AV vendors in the dust as they pursue the title of “next-generation security company” (whatever that means).
Topics: IBM Microsoft Palo Alto Networks Cisco Information and Risk Management Sourcefire FireEye McAfee Security and Privacy Security Malwarebytes Triumfant Mandiant Avast trend micro RSA antivirus Cylance Bit9 Anti-malware APT Trusteer