VMworld 2016 Key Takeaway: The Announcement of “VMEverywhere”  (includes video)

As the hours count down to the official coming together of Dell and EMC (and thus VMware), we could all be forgiven for overlooking the events of last week at the 2016 version of VMWorld. While I think it would be fair to say that there wasn’t a breathless enthusiasm from those covering the immediate news at the event – no cries of “hold the front [web] page!” -- there was nonetheless a lot of both content and intent whose impacts will be seen more gradually, but tellingly, over the coming years. While “VMEverywhere” is neither a product nor (as far as I know!?) an actual initiative at VMware, it was nonetheless the essence of what was discussed last week. There was some product, lots of principle, and – given the pervasiveness of VMware – a realistic possibility of success.

To get into some of the details – both about strategy and some key product areas – I and some of my ESG colleagues that attended the event give their succinct views in this short recap video.

Topics: Storage VMware VMworld 2016

VMworld: My Cybersecurity-centric Impressions

In my last blog, I wrote about what I was anticipating as far as cybersecurity for VMworld. Now that I’m back from Vegas, it’s time for me to report on how reality aligned with my expectations.

  1. NSX penetration. It seems like VMware has made progress in terms of NSX market penetration over the past year. At VMworld 2015, VMware talked about around 1,000 production environments for NSX while at VMworld 2016, VMware mentioned somewhere between 1,700 to 2,000 production NSX customers. Still a small percentage of the total VMware installed base but at least 70% growth year-over-year. Yes, some of these customers are likely just getting started or are using NSX on an extremely limited basis, but I still see good progress happening as more and more organizations begin playing with and using NSX. VMware describes three primary uses for NSX:  Disaster recovery, security, and network operations automation. It is worth noting that around 60% to 70% of NSX deployment is skewed toward security use cases. 
Topics: Network Security Cybersecurity VMware VMworld cloud security

VMware Expands NSX Use Cases With Cross-Cloud

Companies now have alternatives to big capital outlays for networking equipment.

VMware has banged the drum loudly about security as a top use case for its NSX network virtualization platform via micro-segmentation. At VMworld this week, the vendor previewed another use case for NSX based on its Cross-Cloud Architecture that will enable customers to create and manage a unified network across private and public clouds.

 

Topics: VMware Networking NSX

Cybersecurity and VMworld

With memories of Black Hat still in my head, I’m back in Las Vegas for VMworld. I’m sure there will be plenty of generic VMware and partner announcements but I’m here to assess how VMware is addressing enterprise security requirements with its technologies and partner relationships. 

Topics: Cloud Computing Cybersecurity VMware VMworld cloud security

Do we still need VM-specific backup tools? [video]

This is one of the big questions in 2016 (and each of the past few years as well). 

Have the “traditional” unified data protection solutions caught up in reliability and agility to the degree that the need for “point products” that only protect VMs are no longer necessary? To help answer the question, I've recorded a short video:

Topics: Data Protection VMware Information and Risk Management Jason Buffington Video openstack Hyper-V Server Virtualization VM-backup-recovery

VMware's Cloud Management Platform - Multi-Cloud for the Hybrid Masses

Unlike businesses born in the digital or Amazon age, most traditional businesses are not planning to go all in on public cloud. Rather, many are planning to take a hybrid cloud approach, whereby some business workloads will be shifted into the public cloud, while other workloads will remain on-premises. The hope is that in doing so, businesses will save money by leveraging the economies of scale of public cloud infrastructure resources and regain focus on what they’re good at so they can be more competitive. Sounds great, but it’s easier said than done.

Topics: VMware hybrid cloud

What Does the Future Hold for VMware Workstation and VMware Fusion?

According to the hyper-connected world in which we operate, it appears that as part of VMware’s layoffs, the company let go a handful of engineers dedicated to its personal desktop products. No disrespect to these VMware Workstation and VMware Fusion engineers, but this looks like a sound business decision based on the overarching VMware EUC strategy and timing of the pending Dell acquisition.

Topics: VMware desktop virtualization Enterprise Mobility sanjay poonen

VMware Operations Transformation Services

I have written an ESG brief on VMware's Operations Transformation Services.  The brief is available to ESG subscription clients only, but I have summarized a few points below.

These are professional services that are especially useful for adopting new technologies that require changing the way IT operations are traditionally performed. Such new technologies include products like VMware NSX (network virtualization), which can encounter a challenge for successful deployment if traditionally separate teams such as networking and the server virtualization teams do not collaborate properly.

Topics: VMware SDDC

What Happens to RSA?

While last week’s Dell/EMC merger was certainly a blockbuster, nothing specific was mentioned about future plans for RSA Security. Michael Dell did say that there were a “number of discussions about security” during the negotiations, but apparently, no concrete plans yet. Infosec reporters have lobbed phone calls into Round Rock Texas as well as Bedford and Hopkinton, MA looking for more details, but Dell and EMC officials haven’t responded.

Topics: EMC Cybersecurity VMware Dell RSA

VMware NSX and Cisco ACI – IT nirvana or a Kafka-esque nightmare?

In the Franz Kafka novella, Metamorphosis, traveling salesman Gregor Samsa awakens one morning to discover that he has transformed into a hideous creature. Shunned by his family and despite his best efforts to adapt to his new conditions, Gregor eventually withers away and dies alone in his bedroom. Can Kafka’s story serve as a cautionary tale for those IT organizations trying to force transformation into their IT infrastructure too quickly?

Topics: Cisco VMware NSX ACI private cloud