Dan Conde

Dan Conde

Dan is a senior analyst covering distributed system technologies including cloud computing and enterprise networking. In this era of IT infrastructure transformation, Dan’s research focuses on the interactions of how and where workloads run, and how end-users and systems connect to each other. Cloud technologies are driving much of the changes in IT today. Dan’s coverage includes public cloud platforms, cloud and container orchestration systems, software-defined architectures and related management tools. Connectivity is important to link users and applications to new cloud based IT. Areas covered include data center, campus, wide-area and software-defined networking, network virtualization, storage networking, network security, internet/cloud networking and related monitoring & management tools. His experience in product management, marketing, professional services and software development provide a broad view into the needs of vendors and end-users.

Recent Posts by Dan Conde:

What Happened to the Store with Incomplete Digital Transformation

People asked me to follow up on my experience at Best Buy. Spoiler: The particular store where I had my bad experience has closed. I'll give you some details

Topics: Networking Digital Transformation

SD-WAN Should Not Be a Scary Thought

Despite the hoopla related to SD-WAN, the concept is still alien and scary to many network service providers.

At a panel discussing SD-WAN at INCOMPAS 2017 (speakers by Multiapplied Communications, TPx Communications, VeloCloud, and Windstream; chaired by Dave Malfara, CEO, ETC Group), the speakers asked the audience "Who here is very familiar with SD-WAN?" Only a few hands went up. 

The issue is that many of the people in the audience have businesses selling the older technologies that are being supplanted by SD-WAN, such as MPLS circuits. 

But they know that changes are afoot. The title of the panel was "SD-WAN: Killer App in the Making." Are they resisting change, embracing change, or just plain confused?

I have a feeling that it's the "confusion" part since SD-WAN is so ill-defined. Is it software, devices, or the network? Or all of the above?

I bet you know the answer.

Topics: Networking Cloud Services & Orchestration

RCS and Universal Communications - This Time, It May Work

An annoying fact of modern inter-personal messaging is that there are many methods. A glance at any smartphone may show many apps for messaging, video conferencing or teleconferencing such as Allo, Duo & Meet (from Google), Messenger & WhatsApp (from Facebook), Signal, Cisco WebEx, built-in Dialer & SMS text messaging, Zoom, Skype, LinkedIn, LINE, Twitter, Facetime, Messages & Facetime (from Apple), GoToMeeting, WeChat (prominent in China), and Join.me. Plus, there are many many more.

Extending to the desktop, we might find SIP softphones such as Bria, RingCentral  and cousins of the above apps that allow for multi-endpoint logins. These apps provide voice, screen sharing, and text messaging but in this blog, we're talking about the need for universal messaging.

Thus, if you want to send a quick note to someone, it’s hard to figure out what to use. Many young people don’t use voice calls anymore, so they resort to messaging. Phones do a reasonable job of associating contacts with different platforms, but you never know if they are properly logged-in to a particular system. So, messages will fail to get delivered, or auto-converted to emails that get delivered later.

Topics: Networking Cloud Services & Orchestration

SDN and Network Virtualization Revisited

The concept of SDN evolves over time. At the beginning, it was all about OpenFlow and many switch vendors adopted OpenFlow support in their devices. Later on, network virtualization overlays became popular, and characterized by products such as Cisco ACI, Juniper Contrail (and OpenContrail), Nuage Networks VSP, and VMware NSX, and open source projects such as OVN.

Topics: Networking Cloud Services & Orchestration

Box is a Platform, Not a Storage Provider

One of the quandaries of a company so well associated with one solution is that it obscures all the innovation they are working on to evolve. At Box’s BoxWorks, they continue to add to the platform with capabilities that take them away from being identified as a storage provider. It’s now fundamentally an enterprise content management and governance system. They are also a cloud platform, but not in the sense that AWS, Google Cloud, or Microsoft are. They are a cloud platform for aggregating the resources from other providers and providing structure to the content.

Topics: Cloud Services & Orchestration

Focus on the Right Thing about Containers: What the Workloads Perform, not How They Do It

Much attention has been placed on modern applications and containers, and perhaps to excess. People wrote and worried about the choice of container orchestration systems—whether it’s Kubernetes, Marathon, or Swarm.

Also silly are comparisons of containers as a replacement for virtual machines, or whether serverless systems, such as AWS Lambda, are the new replacement for containers. Much of that was due to misconceptions, a desire to see a horse race where none exists, or a side effect of in-fighting in the open source community, with sponsoring organizations or vendors in the sidelines.

Topics: Networking Cloud Services & Orchestration

Network Services: Procurement and the Role of Service Providers

This is another piece in the “Road to Mobile World Congress” blogs. First part is here.

 

One of the choices in the move toward deploying solutions “as-a-service” is how something fundamental like network and services will be delivered. Unlike software, it’s obvious that some equipment is necessary at all locations, but as we have seen in the role of virtual CPE (vCPE), it’s possible to have much of the intelligence pushed out to the central office or to the cloud as virtualized services. 

Topics: Networking Enterprise Mobility

LTE and 5G: The Role of Wireless in Future SD-WAN

As the debut of Mobile World Congress Americas approaches, I'm writing a series of blogs to describe how the solutions related to mobile carriers affect general enterprise networking.

 

 

SD-WAN has traditionally been a solution for branch networks that involves the combination of landline networks, such as MPLS, broadband, and even DSL. What’s not well appreciated is the participation of mobile networks, specifically LTE, to provide one of the paths for branch networking.

Topics: Networking Enterprise Mobility

Cisco Ramps Up Security With Intent-based Networking

Encrypted Traffic Analytics and SD-Access integrate security into the enterprise network.

Security is a big part of Cisco's new intent-based networking strategy. The key security pieces are Encrypted Traffic Analytics and Software-Defined Access. The details of hardware support such as the Catalyst 9000 switches aren't as important as how the new architecture provides a new way for enterprises to approach security by integrating it into the network.

Topics: Networking

Cisco Intent-Based Networking Brings SDN to the Enterprise

Automation platform promises to make software-defined networking a reality for campus networks.

At Cisco Live, networking pros heard a lot about Cisco's new intent-based networking strategy and technologies. On the surface, the technologies look like an evolution of Cisco's existing enterprise network products. Intent-based networking was actually available with Cisco's ACI platform, Digital Network Architecture (DNA). It was announced in March 2016, and the Catalyst 9000 family of switches is a version of the venerable switch. New technologies include software-defined access and encrypted traffic analytics.

However, we need to focus on the bigger picture rather than the individual products. Altogether, they're actually a long-awaited realization of software-defined networking branching out beyond the data center and finding its way into the enterprise.

Topics: Networking