Steve Duplessie

Steve Duplessie

Steve Duplessie, founder and senior analyst at ESG, is an internationally recognized expert in IT infrastructure technologies and markets. An acclaimed speaker and author, Steve’s insights have been featured in Time Magazine, The Wall Street Journal, BusinessWeek, The Financial Times, USA Today, China Daily, The Moscow Times, and many other print and online publications. Steve is a valued strategic advisor to many of the largest technology providers in the world, including IBM, HP, Dell, EMC, NetApp, HDS, Google, Amazon, Puppet, and other global IT organizations.

Recent Posts by Steve Duplessie:

Growing Up in IT: 20 Years of ESG

Well, we did it. We hit the 20-year milestone here at ESG! And what a crazy ride it has been. In many ways, things are not much different in the world: IT remains a second class citizen many times, demands are constantly growing, budgets are constantly shrinking, and IT gets the raw end of the deal.

Joe Tucci’s Next Phase

Lately I’ve been reflecting on the past, which is new to me since I normally only care about the future. But even I get nostalgic from time to time. ESG is in its 20th year! That’s crazy.

So whether it’s the romantic in me or the fact that I’m now experienced enough to reflect on the countless amazing things I’ve seen over my career, you’ll be hearing stories from my past with an eye toward the future. This tale is just that—the next phase of one Joe Tucci.

Topics: Storage

The NetApp Lesson: Adapt and Flourish

This week NetApp founder Dave Hitz retired. Before I make my point, a little history:

In 1993 I started an east coast company, Invincible Technologies Corp. (ITC), which turned out to be quite vincible after all. My compatriots and I were building NFS servers called Lifelines. They were serious machines, sold by serious people in suits and ties, with serious marketing. At the same time, some hippies out west started a company called Network Appliance (eventually NetApp). Dave Hitz and his partner James Lau built an NFS server, which they called the Toaster. I don’t think they had a sales person.

Fast forward to 1999 and the business-savvy, suit wearing, serious company ITC was kaput while the hippie Linux-lovers of Silicon Valley were a public homerun. Turns out that eventually, the person with a product that actually works has a much better chance of success than a bunch of good sales people with a good-looking box that doesn’t. Dave Hitz was a billionaire, and I was a shamble.

Carbonite Buys Webroot – Why You Should Care

Cloud data protection player Carbonite just agreed to acquire cloud endpoint security player Webroot for $618M in cash.

My first immediate concern is that I’ve seen this before. Symantec bought Veritas – same logic: marry endpoint security with data protection – because that makes sense – except it didn’t work. It failed spectacularly.

Having said that, times are different, so I won’t immediately write it off. But I do have big concerns.

Topics: Cybersecurity Data Protection

The True Value of SaaS and Managed Service Offerings

SaaS companies carry huge valuations when compared with traditional licensed software companies. It took me forever to figure out why, but I did.

Best of Breed

Over the last few years I’ve been fascinated by the ever-interesting cybersecurity market. It’s the latest wild, wild west of technology frontiers. It’s a massive market, that is perfect in many ways—for me and ESG at least. Maybe not so much for you poor folk trying to deal with it.

Topics: Cybersecurity

The Case Against AWS – And It’s Not AWS' Fault

Recently the NSA, a highly secure US government entity, left an unprotected disk image loaded with classified information right out in public on AWS. 

Topics: Cybersecurity

Nothing in IT Really Ends - Capisce? (Video)

I recently spent a little time in Italy, where I realized that whether in life or IT, nothing ever really goes away.

Topics: Cloud Services & Orchestration

Hybrid Data Management (Video)

I've been ranting recently about how if you knew then what you know now about all things infrastructure, you would never ever do things the way you're doing them. I don't care if it's about taking 8,000 copies of the same never-changing data in a backup operation, or replicating the same information from box to box to box across the globe to support some S.L.A. or business outcome that originated with a request from 1985. We spend way too much time doing things the way we know how to do, and not doing things the way they should be. For example's sake and because I'm lazy, I'll stick with storage. 

Watch the video for my thoughts on hybrid data management.

In the Age Of Never-ending Technology Conquests, Common Sense Still Trumps All

Left unchecked, engineers will never actually finish a product. They can always find another great feature to jam into it, and it will only take a few more months. Conversely, salespeople can always sell what’s next way easier than they can sell what’s now. This polarity works, normally. When either is out of balance, companies screw up.

I have a 2015 Chevy Tahoe. Lovely (mostly) vehicle. Has a tremendous amount of bells and whistles. Too many to be useful. Case in point; when I approach a toll booth, the car actually says, “Warning: toll booth.” Someone spent time and money engineering software to determine that a toll booth is within 57 feet of me, and decided it was imperative that the vehicle let me know this fact. Because otherwise I may not know by the simple facts that I’m A: at a toll booth, B: at the toll booth with 8 billion others, or C: it’s probably not a good idea to accelerate to 120MPH whilst going through a toll booth. Fortunately, in this new technology advancement age, the toll booths in MA have all been torn down – and there are new overhead invisible toll suckers in the sky on the highways, which read our plates or tags and charge us accordingly. So now, even when I’m not actually driving through a toll booth, my car still reminds me that I’m driving under a virtual toll booth. That is a prime example of overthinking a non-existing problem.