Women in Cybersecurity: Arti Raman

Arti RamanThis episode of Women in Cybersecurity features Arti Raman, the founder and CEO of Titaniam, an innovative data security company that helps organization protect their data even if they have been infiltrated.

Arti didn't start out in cybersecurity; her education was in economics and math, but when she worked at Agiliance in the area of Governance, Risk, and Compliance (GRC) 12 years ago, she was drawn to solving security problems and decided to put her analytical background to use to solve challenging security problems. She then worked at Symantec, where she tackled enterprise cybersecurity challenges, such as data center security and isolating workloads. Today, she leads her own company, drawing from her past experience of running another successful startup before she got into cybersecurity. Don't miss her video below, and be sure to check out the full audio interview.

Arti went from receiving an undergraduate degree in economics and math straight into a PhD program, but halfway through the program, she decided to put her skills and her experience into commercial applications to use. Starting out as a consultant at American Management Systems (AMS), a high-tech management and consulting firm, she consulted on projects, including customer relationship management (CRM) and data warehousing. Arti was in her early 20s when she founded her first startup, Liquid Engine. After five years, she sold the tax management company to Thomson Reuters.

Later, she moved to Agiliance, working in GRC, and then she transitioned into cybersecurity when she moved to Symantec. After running competitive intelligence and market intelligence, Arti found a gap in information protection, so she started her own security company, Titaniam.

"Security is such a rich domain, and if you've got any analytical or mathematics background, you can find those inclinations in your brain well exercised in the security domain," she said. 

With experience under her belt from her first startup, she discussed the importance of working hard on her product and its value proposition, investing her time in solving customer problems, benchmarking its effectiveness in the lab, and working closely with enterprise customers so she could build the best product and bring it to market.

The company is focused on solving the challenge with encryption, which typically works "at rest," meaning it works only when it is not being accessed. Arti decided to apply her knowledge of math, systems, and cryptography to create "encryption in use" to solve the problem of protecting data with encryption while it is in use. This helps enterprises protect valuable data, even if the company is infiltrated or if data is being accessed by a malicious person who got in with valid credentials.

Arti shared her favorite resources for women in cybersecurity:
Women in Technology International: https://witi.com/
Executive Women’s Forum: https://www.ewf-usa.com/
Second Time Founders: https://secondtimefounders.com/
The Rise of Privacy Tech (TROPT): https://www.riseofprivacytech.com/

 Learn more about Arti's company, Titaniam, and follow her on LinkedIn

 

Be sure to visit ESG's Women in Cybersecurity page, where you can also find a link to the full audio interview with Arti where we discuss this and much more. You can also view past episodes and connect with us to hear more inspiring stories in future shows.

Topics: Cybersecurity women in cybersecurity